SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

chillicothegazette.com

Sep 30, 2012
Mary Ann Brown, a retired school teacher and former site manager at the Adena Mansion, who spoke to members of the Arthur St. Clair Chapter Sons of the American Revolution about the War of 1812 at the chapter's recent meeting.

Mary Ann Brown, a retired school teacher and former site manager at the Adena Mansion, who spoke to members of the Arthur St. Clair Chapter Sons of the American Revolution about the War of 1812 at the chapter’s recent meeting.

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This year marks the beginning of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, which lasted from 1812 to 1815. It is sometimes called America’s Second War for Independence because it was fought against the British. Mary Ann Brown, a retired school teacher who has spent 44 years with the Ohio Historical Society and served 25 years as the site manager of the Adena Mansion, home of former U.S. Senator Thomas Worthington, spoke to members of the Arthur St. Clair Chapter Sons of the American Revolution (at the invitation of Chapter Vice President David Rieder) about the War of 1812 at the chapter’s recent meeting.

Brown highlighted the events associated with the War of 1812, including Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory against the British on Lake Erie; the burning of Washington D.C., the Battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Md., which resulted in the writing of the national anthem by Francis Scott Key; and the Battle of New Orleans, which propelled Andrew Jackson to the White House as the nation’s seventh president.

Brown reviewed the roles played in Ohio by then-Sen. Worthington, Gen. William Henry Harrison, the governor of the Northwest Territory; and the British supported Indian attack on Fort Meigs, near presen-day Perrysburg, and the defeat of the British and the death of famed Shawnee Indian Chief Tecumseh on Oct. 5, 1813, during the Battle of the Thames in Canada.

She reviewed the role Chillicothe played in the war as a staging area and that Chillicothe was the home of Camp Bull, a prisoner of war camp for British prisoners. The war ended with the Treaty of Ghent, and most historians consider the outcome pretty much of a draw.

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