Manitoulin writers examine the War of 1812

Thursday, July 19, 2012 6:09:24 EDT PM

Re-enactors help make history come alive Tuesday, July 17, 2012, at Fort St. Joseph Historic Site, on St. Joseph Island, east of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., as re-enactors, musicians and guest speakers were among those to partake in the signature event of the Algoma 1812 Bicentennial, marking the time when Fort St. Joseph and its alliance took over Fort Michilimackinac. DONNA SCHELL/SPECIAL TO THE STAR/QMI AGENCY

Re-enactors help make history come alive Tuesday, July 17, 2012, at Fort St. Joseph Historic Site, on St. Joseph Island, east of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., as re-enactors, musicians and guest speakers were among those to partake in the signature event of the Algoma 1812 Bicentennial, marking the time when Fort St. Joseph and its alliance took over Fort Michilimackinac. DONNA SCHELL/SPECIAL TO THE STAR/QMI AGENCY

Gore Bay – Two hundred years ago, the residents of North America were caught up in a scattered and often confusing conflict that carried on for three years.On June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain and to this day, observers on both sides of the border have been revisioning and re-imagining all that transpired.

During this bicentennial summer, the Manitoulin Writers’ Circle and the Gore Bay Museum and Heritage Centre are collaborating to interpret and examine some of the characters and issues involved in the War of 1812.

The public is invited to an afternoon of literary readings on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. in the museum gallery.

Using history as a catalyst for creativity, local island writers have produced a series of original compositions. In the new letters, short fiction, scripts, editorials and poetry, the writers have speculated on the experiences and motivations of some of the key participants.

Listeners will have an opportunity to revisit some familiar battle sites including Fort Michilimackinac, Fort St. Joseph, the Battle of the Thames, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Fort York and Washington. They will hear the voices of such prominent figures as Sir Isaac Brock, William Henry Harrison, Tecumseh, Laura Secord and other more obscure players who may never be recognized in official history books.

For more information call 705-282-2040 (museum) or 705-282-1714 (writers’ circle.)

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